The University of Utah
College of Architecture + Planning

Theme

Architecture of Complexity
design, systems, society and environment

June 14-17, 2017
University of Utah
College of Architecture + Planning

Theme

Architecture is contextually contingent.  Once the social, economic, and environmental networks and systems that presuppose architecture become a fundamental context for design, then the capability and culpabilities of architecture and its systems become newly, and more intensely, important.  Ulrich Beck suggests that we are in a new phase of modernity in which architects’ operations can be characterized by the development and implementation of contextual systems of increasing hazard. Our belief that society can control the dangers that itself produces is self-defeating.  Ulrich suggests that we wrestle today with the side effects of yesterday’s successes.  How can we ensure a tomorrow that does not suffer from the same fate?

 

Systems thinking focuses on large-scale dynamic networks, rather than linear cause-and-effect relationships.  In building, thinking systemically requires an equifinality approach: recognition that there are multiple ways to answer the problem of building, which lead in turn to different ways to organize design practice.  Further, systems thinking uses multi-finality: recognition that similar initial conditions of cost, scale, and scope can yield widely different building results. This demands a broader understanding of what constitutes architecture.  It demands a more systemic and holistic approach to the built environment.

 

Complicatedness is unforgiving in building, and the call for holistic thinking risks being inflated to an obtuse level where the system becomes an unmanageable mess of parts and relationships that become too untraceable to mean much of anything. As such, systems thinking in building practice requires defining the extent of the system – framing the inquiry to determine the specific parts, linkages, and networks.  This makes architecture of complicatedness into an architecture of complexity.  While complicatedness is confusing, alienating, and inefficient; complexity is rigorous, rich, layered, and meaningful.

 

The conference theme is the architecture of complexity.  It seeks for the creation, clarification, codification and communication of research knowledge on architecture as design, systems, society and environmental networks.  This call is for papers that span the modalities and domains of research, scholarship and creative work in architecture: history, theory, criticism, quantitative, qualitative, technical, applied, classroom, and practice.  This is also a call for allied disciplines in planning, design, engineering and business, as well as the physical and social sciences to ask questions and begin to answer why, what, and how of complexity in the built environment.

 

Conference Co-Chairs:

Ryan E. Smith

Keith Diaz Moore

Wei (Windy) Zhao

University of Utah

 

Call for Submissions

Submission of papers is in a two stage review – abstracts and full papers. Poster submissions have a one stage review.   There will be a limited number of paper and poster presentations. Submissions are double blind peer-reviewed.  Selected abstracts will be invited to submit a final paper or poster, which must be original, unpublished material, 6-8 pages (A4, 8.5×11) in length for papers; and one (A1, 24×36 horizontal) for posters.  The papers of authors who attend the conference will be published in the proceedings.  Posters will not be published. 

Below is also a call for PhD session abstracts and whitepapers for a plenary session. 

Timeline

December 16th – Deadline for poster abstracts

December 31st – Notification of poster acceptance

January 9th – Deadline for plenary session and doctoral workshop submissions (see call below)

February 15th – Deadline for final paper and poster submissions (no larger than 10 MB)

February 1st – Notification of plenary session and doctoral workshop acceptance

June 14-17 – Conference in Salt Lake City

Doctoral Student Workshop

The Architectural Research Centers Consortium invites Ph.D. students to apply to participate in a Doctoral Student Workshop.  This workshop is designed to provide a forum for students at either the proposal phase or in the interpretation phase of their dissertation work to present and discuss their ongoing research (or proposal) with senior mentors in architectural research. The purpose of the workshop is to strengthen and further thesis/dissertation work, as well to support the development of networks for young researchers in Architecture and related disciplines.

This workshop will take place on Thursday, June 15, 2017 at the ARCC Annual Conference in Salt Lake City, UT.  During the afternoon workshop each student selected to present their work will be allotted a 45 minute slot – 15 min to present their dissertation work to date followed by 30 min of feedback and discussion with mentors. These extended sessions are intended to provide focused feedback related to furthering and improving the work.  Due to its peer-reviewed nature, acceptance would count as a reviewed presentation.

Please note: Students accepted to present and/or attend the Graduate Student Workshop are expected to commit to the full 4 hours of the workshop which would then preclude them from attending other parallel sessions. All students accepted to participate in the workshop as either presenters or observers are also expected to be registered for the full conference (there is a student rate of $150).

The number of student presenters is limited to 8 students.  However, up to 12 spaces will be available for other students as observers to attend and participate in the workshop sessions.

To apply:

Students are asked to submit a 250-word abstract on their work and answer the following question in the body of their submission:

Why do you seek feedback in this particular venue and how do you hope it will further your research?

Submissions should uploaded to Conftool, the conference submission site and are due at the end of business hours on Monday, January 9th.  Students who just wish to observe are asked to send their request to attend to arcc2017@arch.utah.edu with their name and PhD granting institution on the same deadline (no abstract required).  Notification of acceptance will be by February 1, 2017.

Plenary Session Presentations

The Architectural Research Centers Consortium solicits respondent white papers for a plenary session to be held at the annual conference in Salt Lake City.  The plenary session will take place on Thursday, June 15, 2017 from 9:00 AM to 10:00 PM.  As the theme of the conference is Architecture of Complexity, this call is for written responses to a “systems thinking” video lecture by the late Russ Ackoff, Professor Emeritus of Management Science from Warton School, University of Pennsylvania.  Up to three respondents will be selected through a peer review process.

This call is to write a response to Ackoff’s talk on continuous and discontinuous improvement through the lens of systems thinking and explain how this relates to research in the built environment.  Papers may positively and/or negatively critique Ackoff’s position as it relates to architecture.  The responses are encouraged to be thought provoking, polemical and provoke discussion and critical awareness of the theme(s) of the conference.  As the first formal session of the conference, the papers in this session will lay the ground work for much of what will follow over the course of the conference. Selected papers will then be presented in the plenary session following the audience watching the same video by Ackoff.  Each presentation will be no more than 10 minutes.

Submit a 1000 word or less response to Ackoff’s to Systems Thinking video in Word.doc or PDF format.  Upload your presentation to the paper portal at Conftool, the conference submission site.  All whitepapers must not have any indicators of authorship in order to remain anonymous for peer review.  Submissions are due at the end of business hours on Monday, January 9th.  Notification of acceptance will be by February 1, 2017.

Registration

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Conference Location: University of Utah | Salt Lake City, Utah

Conference Dates: June 14–17, 2017

ARCC 2017 Early Registration

until April 1, 2017

  • Registration includes access to all keynote speakers, plenary, paper and poster sessions. Lunch Thursday and Friday and dinner on Friday night are included.
  • Lodging and ground transportation are not included. Room block will be held until Monday, May 15, 2017.
  • A digital copy of the proceedings is included. Hard copies will be available for purchase online.

Conference Schedule

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Preliminary Schedule

Day 1  W 6.14

 

 

 

 

Day 2 TH 6.15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 3 F 6.16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 4 Sa 6.17

1:00 PM

5:00 PM

6:00 PM

7:00 PM

 

8:00 AM

8:30 AM

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

12:00 PM

1:00 PM

3:00 PM

3:30 PM

5:30 PM

7:00 PM

 

8:00 AM

8:30 AM

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

12:00 PM

1:00 PM

3:00 PM

3:30 PM

5:30 PM

6:00 PM

7:00 PM

 

8:30 AM

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

12:00 PM

Registration

Keynote Lecture Steven A. Moore

Reception

Dinner on your own

 

Breakfast at the hotel

Registration

Opening Plenary Session

Paper Session (4) = 12 papers

Lunch

Paper Session (4) = 12 papers

Break

Paper Session (4) = 12 papers

Poster Session, Reception

Dinner on your own

 

Breakfast at hotel

ARCC Strategic Planning Meeting, Elections

Plenary Session

Paper Session (4) = 12 papers

Lunch

Paper Session (4) = 12 papers

Break

Research Needs Workshop

Break

Keynote Lecture Jason F. McLennan

Dinner Downtown (take TRAX)

 

Breakfast at hotel

Closing Plenary

Paper Session (4) = 12 papers

Sack Lunch, Tours

Walking Tours

Downtown walking tour
City Library (Moshie Safdie)
Federal Courthouse (Tom Pfiefer)
Historic Temple Square (tabernacle, conference center, city creek)
Wasatch Back Mountain Tour
Park City
Euclid Timber Frame
Girl Scout CLT cabins

The College of Architecture + Urban Planning is located at

375 South 1530 East, Suite 235, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Transportation TRAX-CityCtyBldg_S_Greenwood

Lodging

There are 2 lodging options that have been provided at a discounted rate for ARCC attendees.

GUEST HOUSE – A block of 75 single king bed rooms have been reserved at the University Guest House located within walking distance of the conference venues on the University of Utah campus with a conference rate of $105/night + tax*.  This is 3-star hotel type accommodations and breakfast is included.  Room block will be held until Monday, May 15, 2017.

Attendees are responsible for booking their own reservations – call 801-587-1000 (local) or 888-416-4075 (toll free) to make a reservation. Make sure to reference the ARCC 2017 Conference when making your reservation to get the conference rate.

You may also make your reservation online, but make sure to enter “Reservation for ARCC Conference Rate” in the Comments/Special Requests section of the Reservation Summary page when booking to ensure you receive the correct rate.

DORMITORIES – A block of 50 single twin bed dormitories has been reserved on campus at the University of Utah within walking distance of the conference venues.  This option is a $50 registration fee for handling and a $40/night rate.  Dormitories are set up with a private room and a shared bathroom with one other resident.  You may request to share a bathroom with an identified guest in the registration process.  There is a cafeteria next door where breakfast may be purchased.  Reserve your dormitory online.

For those interested in staying downtown, a map of suggested hotels is provided here (opens as PDF). All suggested hotels are proximate to TRAX, the public light rail system, that has regular access to the university campus. Please note that there is not a conference rate at any hotel other than the University Guest House and Dormitories.

 

Contact Us

If you have any questions or concerns regarding submission materials or conference details, please take a moment to fill out the form below and we will contact you as soon as possible.

 

Co-Chairs:


Ryan E. Smith
Keith Diaz Moore
Wei (Windy) Zhao

– University of Utah, College of Architecture + Planning

Day 1 Keynote Address

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Steven A. Moore is Bartlett Cocke Regents Professor of Architecture and Planning at the University of Texas at Austin where he teaches design and interdisciplinary courses related to the philosophy, history, and application of sustainable technology. Before completing his Ph.D. in 1996, Moore was the Design Principal of Moore/Weinrich Architects in Maine (1970-91). At UT, he served as Director of the Graduate Program in Sustainable Design (2000-2016), founded the Graduate Portfolio Program in Sustainability (2005), and is Co-founder of the University of Texas Center for Sustainable Development (2003). Moore is a Fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts, a Loeb Fellow of the Harvard Graduate School of Design, the recipient of an Individual Scholar Award from the National Science Foundation. He is the author of many articles, twenty-five book chapters and seven books on the topic of sustainable architecture and urbanism. Moore’s most recent book, the second Edition of Pragmatic Sustainability: Dispositions for Critical Adaptation, appeared in July 2016.

Day 3 Keynote Address

MCLENNAN MUG

Jason F. McLennan is considered one of the most influential individuals in the green building movement today and the recipient of the prestigious Buckminster Fuller Prize, Jason F. McLennan’s work has made a pivotal impact on the shape and direction of green building in the United States and Canada and he is a much sought after presenter and consultant on a wide variety of green building and sustainability topics around the world. McLennan previously served as the CEO of the International Living Future Institute – a leading NGO that focuses on the transformation to a world that is socially just, culturally rich and ecologically restorative. An Ashoka Fellow, Jason is the founder and creator of the Living Building Challenge, widely considered the world’s most progressive and stringent green building program. He is the author of five books: The Philosophy of Sustainable Design, The Dumb Architect’s Guide to Glazing Selection, The Ecological Engineer, Zugunruhe and Transformational Thought.